Tag Archives: Charles Darwin

“Typus Excessus” by Zireaux

Pamela Anderson

Novelist, Pamela Anderson

Typus Excessus
(Stanzas from the prologue of Res Publica, Book One)
by
Zireaux

To M.

12.

My poem is true. And those who say,
how come we never read about it,
or saw it on Holmes1 – let me shout it:
You did! You did! There wasn’t a day
since summer, ’98, when mention
wasn’t made of my intentions.
TV One, the Herald, the Times.
So many events conveyed in these rhymes
between my pro- and epilogue,
appeared in the news, or someone’s blog,
or on a million cell-phone screens
from Russia to the Philippines.

13.

I have no doubt my story was seen
by you, my reader – and likely dismissed
by you as well. We seem to exist
in modern life as magazines
in quest to raise our circulation.
Life’s designed by copulation,
so said that brilliant thinker, Darwin;2
but, too, we yearn for a story to star in;
and they – our stories – compete as well.
Some with fiction cast their spell;
some rely on brainy proof.
For nothing’s quite as fit as truth.

14.

And that’s just it – for in these days
of typus excessus, everyone
(including Pamela Anderson!)13
is smitten with the writing craze.
It’s hard to tell just what is fit
and what is shit – and if they split
apart at all; if entertaining
fiction – en masse – is truth-attaining;
and whether truth, concise or wordy,
proven or not, can find a sturdy
spot of well-protected ground
midst waves of falsehood.

                                                Or must it drown?

__
1Popular news presenter who once referred to UN Secretary General Kofi Annan as a ‘cheeky darkie.’
2Question: Were Darwin alive today — and surely someone of his scientific brilliance exists in the world today — would he blog?
2Pamela Anderson (born 1967), a modern ‘blonde bombshell’ and actress, is best known for her breast implants, her exhibitionist stunts and questionable acting abilities in a 1990s television series called ‘Baywatch’. Her novel,
Star: A Novel, was published by Atria.
__________
Published as part of the dVerse poetry group.

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Filed under Poetry by Zireaux, Res Publica, Book One

“Big Hips and Breasts” — to Charles Darwin — by Zireaux

Siren (real name, Amy Guy) from the TV show, American Gladiators

Siren (real name, Amy Guy) from the TV show, American Gladiators

“Big Hips and Breasts” (From the second canto of the novel-in-verse, Kamal)
by
Zireaux

Now tell me, disciples of Darwin: Are you sure
new life is born of struggles to endure?
That Cupid’s bow, precisely drawn, impregnates
us with love to spawn seraphic playmates?
Perhaps creation’s not so “pro-“ as “re-.”
I mean — those markers of fertility,
big hips and breasts, are said to stir
men’s loins because they help ensure
his healthy brood. But is that it?
The future’s good; hence, we commit?
Or might desire’s crystal ball
be backward-looking, and thus recall
that rousing primal spasm of the senses:
the throb and thrall of life when it commences?

Could that first ecstatic tingling twitch
of long-lost babyhood be something which
— because it fades with time – will always tease
the aging, ever-dying man who sees
a swollen breast, or large, enlivened eyes,
or cherry lips around a Hellenized
and polished column of teeth –- because
these sights bring back what life once was!
No skating board or bungee-fun,
no dive or flight or climb; not one
of Sir Edmund’s grand activities
can match in sensitivity,
the thrill-ride of birth! And once it starts to slow
— the coaster, the slide — we crave another go!

 
Chart on Male Mating ChoicesZireaux’s comments on this poem:
The following (including the graphics) is from “The Evolution of Human Mating,” by David M. Buss, of the University of Texas, Austin, in 2007:

“Evolutionary psychology provides a powerful theory for the evolution of standards of female beauty—whatever observable cues are linked with fertility (immediate probability of conception) or reproductive value (future reproductive potential) will evolve to become part of what humans find attractive in females. These include cues to youth, such as full lips, smooth skin, lustrous hair, and a low ratio of hips to waist (WHR). They also include cues to health, such as clear skin, absence of sores, white teeth, and symmetrical features. Beauty, in short, is in the “psychological adaptations of the beholder,” and men value physical appearance because of the wealth of information it provides about a woman’s youth, health, and hence reproductive capacity.”

Cues that influence male mating selectionIt’s fun to play with, the evolutionary biology model — this newfound substance, a putty or clay that molds to any texture and shape. The problem, however, with books such as Geoffrey Miller’s The Mating Mind, or even On the Origin of Stories by our own Auckland-based Brian Boyd — books which seek to sculpt poetic subjects using evolutionary materials — is that they can sound so plausible and compelling, so theoretically interesting and eye-opening, and yet, in the end, add so little of beauty to the subject they discuss.

Although most evolutionary biologists continue to focus on “fitness factors” in human mating choices (see, for example, the work of David C. Geary, Jacob Vigil, and Jennifer Byrd-Craven University of Missouri-Columbia), I should note that several years after writing the above stanzas in Kamal, I was pleased to read, in a reputable science publication, a proposition very similar to my own.
__________
Published as part of the dVerse group

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Filed under Kamal, Book One, Poetry by Zireaux

Life’s Designed by Copulation — Stanza 13

Charles Darwin

',,,so said that brilliant thinker, Darwin...'

Res Publica, Book One, Prologue

13.

I have no doubt my story was seen
by you, my reader – and likely dismissed
by you as well. We seem to exist
in modern life as magazines
in quest to raise our circulation.
Life’s designed by copulation,
so said that brilliant thinker, Darwin;
but, too, we yearn for a story to star in;
and they – our stories – compete as well.
Some with fiction cast their spell;
some rely on brainy proof.
For nothing’s quite as fit as truth.

Zireaux’s comments on this stanza
Question: Were Darwin alive today — and surely someone of his scientific acuity exists in the world today — would he blog?

Read from the beginning of Res Publica | Listen to the audio version (read by Stuart Devenie) | Buy a signed copy of the book

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Filed under Res Publica, Book One